20
nov
2015

sorrel

Common sorrel or garden sorrel (Rumex acetosa), often simply called sorrel, is a perennial herb in the family Polygonaceae. Other names for sorrel include spinach dock and narrow-leaved dock. It is a common plant in grassland habitats and is cultivated as a garden herb or leaf vegetable (pot herb)

Common sorrel has been cultivated for centuries. The leaves may be puréed in soups and sauces or added to salads; they have a flavour that is similar to kiwifruit or sour wild strawberries. The plant's sharp taste is due to oxalic acid, which is mildly toxic.

Sorrel is a perennial herb in the buckwheat family (which also includes rhubarb). High in vitamin C, it was a common ingredient in medieval times, when it was eaten to prevent scurvy (citrus fruits weren’t widely available). The word sorrel is of Germanic origin, from sur, meaning sour. Its characteristic sourness comes from the presence of oxalic acid (which is also found in spinach).

There are two varieties of sorrel, both of which are edible: garden sorrel, which has pointy, arrow-shaped leaves and a bracingly tart flavor, and French sorrel which is milder, with rounded leaves

Sorrel adds a pleasantly tart note when combined with other greens in salads. Use it in place of parsley or basil for pesto, fold it into omelets, or add it to quiche. Sorrel also makes a delicious side dish for grilled fish or roasted chicken: Briefly sauté it in butter until just wilted (sorrel shrinks like crazy when cooked, so you’ll need a lot) and then sprinkle it with lemon zest and fleur de sel. Take care not to overcook it so it doesn’t lose its leafy texture and herbal aroma. If sorrel’s tang seems too assertive on its own, combine it with more mildly flavored greens like spinach or chard.

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Wine and Sage for your skin tone

SAGE WINE

30 g of Sage leaves, 1 l of red wine

Put Sage to macerate for a week in red wine.
At the end of the sorted the infusion and store it in a bottles.
This wine has tonic, anti-rheumatic and digestive properties.
You should drink the infusion at least 2 times a day.

Try it with one of our organic red wines!

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It's known as purslane - a plant that is a troublesome weed in many U.S. crops, especially vegetables. But recent research findings confirm that purslane is also a rich source of fatty acids, vitamin E, and other key nutrients - making it a prime candidate as a new vegetable crop. It is known for its persistence - it grows even in poor-quality soils with little water and resists disease...

In summary, purslane makes a nice addition to salads, soups and sautés. This is called versatility. Add...

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Lemon Balm was dedicated to the goddess Diana, and used medicinally by the Greeks some 2,000 years ago. In the Middles Ages lemon balm was used to soothe tension, to dress wounds, and as a cure for toothache, skin eruptions, mad dog bites, crooked necks, and sickness during pregnancy. It was even said to prevent baldness. As a medicinal plant, lemon balm has traditionally been employed against bronchial inflammation, earache, fever, flatulence, headaches, high blood pressure, influenza, mood...

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Chianti : Medici's wine

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La bottega del mulino n°1

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