05
nov
2015

bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has the fresh, sweet, citrus scent that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea. Uplifting and relaxing, it is good for building confidence and enhancing your mood. It has a long history of use for oily and troubled skin.

While the distinctive fruit of the bergamot (bergamotto of Italy, bergamote of France) is sometimes referred to as an orange, its resemblances to the oranges are so remote or lacking that it seems best to employ the European usage.  Both the origin of the name and its significance are obscure.  It appears to be a hybrid of the sour orange, however, for which reason it has commonly been regarded as a botanical variety of C. aurantium L.  Since the differences are numerous and marked and a wide degree of variation is exhibited, separate species standing seems to be justified.
      The tree is moderately vigorous, upright to spreading in habit, virtually thornless, and with new shoot growth not pink- or purple-tinted.  At full maturity it is medium-small to medium in size.  The leaves are large and somewhat like the lemon in color, form, and emargination, although the blades are sharper-pointed and the petioles are longer and more broadly winged.
      The flower buds and flowers are medium-large and pure white and there is but one bloom.  The lemon-yellow-colored fruits are small to medium-large, oblate, round obovate or broadly pyriform, frequently possess a small navel, and usually have a persistent style.  The rind is medium-thin with a smooth to moderately rough surface, commonly ridged, and adherent.  The segments are numerous and the core solid.  The flesh is moderately firm, pale greenish-yellow, and highly acid with a faint bitter aftertaste.  The highly monoembryonic seeds, comparatively few and sometimes none, often are not well developed.  The cotyledons are white or faintly green.
      A distinctive characteristic of both foliage and fruits is the strongly pungent and agreeably aromatic oil, which is similar to that of the sour orange leaf, though the rind oil of the latter is different.
      The bergamot has been known in the Mediterranean for several centuries, the distinctive and desirable characteristics of its oil having been recognized as early as 1750.

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

05
dec
chamomile

chamomile

Chamomile or camomile (/ˈkæmɵml/ KAM-ə-meel or /ˈkæmɵml/ KAM-ə-myl)is the common name for several daisy-like plants of the family Asteraceae that are commonly used to make herb infusions to serve various medicinal purposes. Popular uses of chamomile preparations include treating hay fever, inflammation, muscle spasm, menstrual disorders, insomnia, ulcers, gastrointestinal disorder, and hemorrhoids.
The word "chamomile" derives, via French and Latin, from Greek χαμαίμηλον...

24
mar
homemade-deodorant

Homemade deodorant

There are DIY solutions, made with all-natural ingredients, ensuring armpits fresh and smelling. They are fast and very simple to prepare.
The deodorant more healthy and simple is the bicarbonate based: thanks to its Ph basic it fights odors and, being natural, does not prevent the normal skin transpiration.
You can opt for a spray solution, a cream or stick depending on your preference.

This is a preparation mode for a deodorant spray:

Fill a glass with water and baking soda
stir until the...

20
jun
vitamins

Vitamins

Vitamins are important because they allow the body to use the protein, fat and carbohydrates playing an antioxidant function.

They are divided into water-soluble (dissolve with water and are more easily removed) and liposoluble (dissolve in an alcoholic solution and store easily).

The first group contains vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B8, B9, B12 and vitamin C; while they are fat-soluble vitamins A, E, D and K.

Unfortunately ultimately not enough to have a proper diet to take all the necessary...

22
jul
berry

Berry

In order to plant shrubs, you must wait until the last frost and dig deep to place the roots. It is necessary for all types of berries a trellis to support their growth.

At the end of the summer the branches should be pruned and tied up, carefully considering the presence of thorns.

Produce fruit in abundance and the only enemies you may encounter are birds. Berries may be climbing or bushy.

It is recommended to use natural fertilizers does not affect the taste of the fruit when ripe.

For...

29
may
chianti-:-medicis-wine

Chianti : Medici's wine

The history of Chianti dates back to at least the 13th century with the earliest incarnations of Chianti as a white wine. Today this Tuscan wine is one of Italy's most well known and recognizable wines. In the Middle Ages, the villages of Gaiole, Castellina and Radda located near Florence formed as a Lega del Chianti (League of Chianti) creating an area that would become the spiritual and historical "heart" of the Chianti region and today is located within the Chianti Classico Denominazione di...

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La bottega del mulino n°1

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