05
nov
2015

bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has the fresh, sweet, citrus scent that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea. Uplifting and relaxing, it is good for building confidence and enhancing your mood. It has a long history of use for oily and troubled skin.

While the distinctive fruit of the bergamot (bergamotto of Italy, bergamote of France) is sometimes referred to as an orange, its resemblances to the oranges are so remote or lacking that it seems best to employ the European usage.  Both the origin of the name and its significance are obscure.  It appears to be a hybrid of the sour orange, however, for which reason it has commonly been regarded as a botanical variety of C. aurantium L.  Since the differences are numerous and marked and a wide degree of variation is exhibited, separate species standing seems to be justified.
      The tree is moderately vigorous, upright to spreading in habit, virtually thornless, and with new shoot growth not pink- or purple-tinted.  At full maturity it is medium-small to medium in size.  The leaves are large and somewhat like the lemon in color, form, and emargination, although the blades are sharper-pointed and the petioles are longer and more broadly winged.
      The flower buds and flowers are medium-large and pure white and there is but one bloom.  The lemon-yellow-colored fruits are small to medium-large, oblate, round obovate or broadly pyriform, frequently possess a small navel, and usually have a persistent style.  The rind is medium-thin with a smooth to moderately rough surface, commonly ridged, and adherent.  The segments are numerous and the core solid.  The flesh is moderately firm, pale greenish-yellow, and highly acid with a faint bitter aftertaste.  The highly monoembryonic seeds, comparatively few and sometimes none, often are not well developed.  The cotyledons are white or faintly green.
      A distinctive characteristic of both foliage and fruits is the strongly pungent and agreeably aromatic oil, which is similar to that of the sour orange leaf, though the rind oil of the latter is different.
      The bergamot has been known in the Mediterranean for several centuries, the distinctive and desirable characteristics of its oil having been recognized as early as 1750.

18
oct
savory

Savory

Summer savory (Satureja hortensis) is the better known of the savory species. It is an annual, but otherwise is similar in use and flavor to the perennial winter savory. It is used more often than winter savory, which has a slightly more bitter flavor.

This herb has lilac tubular flowers which bloom in the northern hemisphere from July to September. It grows to around 30 to 60 cm (0.98 to 1.97 ft) in height and has very slender, bronze-green leaves.

Summer savory is a traditional popular...

06
apr
aromatic-herbs

Aromatic herbs

Each of us can grow herbs at home rather than buying them at the grocery store.

For seedlings, herbs or seeds if you want to see growth, can be purchased in any nursery and there is often a choice of many varieties.
Should be seeded and kept in the Sun because they can germinate in the most natural way, but also requires a fairly humid environment to ensure that the first seedlings begin to sprout.
For some species of plants can also remove cuttings from existing plants (but not flowers) and...

18
jul
chives

Chives

Chives is the common name of Allium schoenoprasum.

A perennial plant, it is widespread in nature across much of Europe, Asia and North America

Chives are grown for their scapes, which are used for culinary purposes as a flavoring herb, and provide a somewhat milder flavor than those of other Allium species. The smallest and most delicate member of the onion family, chives are a popular herb used in European cookery. They have long, thin green blades that are hollow inside. They have a mild,...

11
may
edible-flowers:-sunflowers

Edible flowers: sunflowers

The finishing touch for a slap is traditionally a floral arrangement. But did you know that an amazing variety of flowers are not only ornamental but also have a great flavor?

Most of the flowers don't withstands high temperatures of cooking, so these or are incorporated at the last moment or used only as decoration.

The sunflower when mature, is covered with coarse hair and is inedible. The flower buds are very tender and edible. They can be steamed or even fries! Their flavor reminiscent of...

18
jun
herbal-tea-of-absinthe

Herbal tea of Absinthe

Dried and crushed Absinthe, hot water, sugar as taste.

Digestive and bitter herbal tea. Need to know how to measure out the amount infused wisely to avoid a preparation absolutely undrinkable. Use no more than 1/4 of a teaspoon of chopped and dried grass or a green leaf per cup of water. With these proportions bad taste is pleasant and sugar is even more acceptable. A small cup of BREW after meals is great for good digestion.

Wormwood is also used to combat fleas, dog garden scale insects...

05
oct
lemon-balm

Lemon balm

Lemon Balm was dedicated to the goddess Diana, and used medicinally by the Greeks some 2,000 years ago. In the Middles Ages lemon balm was used to soothe tension, to dress wounds, and as a cure for toothache, skin eruptions, mad dog bites, crooked necks, and sickness during pregnancy. It was even said to prevent baldness. As a medicinal plant, lemon balm has traditionally been employed against bronchial inflammation, earache, fever, flatulence, headaches, high blood pressure, influenza, mood...