05
nov
2015

bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has the fresh, sweet, citrus scent that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea. Uplifting and relaxing, it is good for building confidence and enhancing your mood. It has a long history of use for oily and troubled skin.

While the distinctive fruit of the bergamot (bergamotto of Italy, bergamote of France) is sometimes referred to as an orange, its resemblances to the oranges are so remote or lacking that it seems best to employ the European usage.  Both the origin of the name and its significance are obscure.  It appears to be a hybrid of the sour orange, however, for which reason it has commonly been regarded as a botanical variety of C. aurantium L.  Since the differences are numerous and marked and a wide degree of variation is exhibited, separate species standing seems to be justified.
      The tree is moderately vigorous, upright to spreading in habit, virtually thornless, and with new shoot growth not pink- or purple-tinted.  At full maturity it is medium-small to medium in size.  The leaves are large and somewhat like the lemon in color, form, and emargination, although the blades are sharper-pointed and the petioles are longer and more broadly winged.
      The flower buds and flowers are medium-large and pure white and there is but one bloom.  The lemon-yellow-colored fruits are small to medium-large, oblate, round obovate or broadly pyriform, frequently possess a small navel, and usually have a persistent style.  The rind is medium-thin with a smooth to moderately rough surface, commonly ridged, and adherent.  The segments are numerous and the core solid.  The flesh is moderately firm, pale greenish-yellow, and highly acid with a faint bitter aftertaste.  The highly monoembryonic seeds, comparatively few and sometimes none, often are not well developed.  The cotyledons are white or faintly green.
      A distinctive characteristic of both foliage and fruits is the strongly pungent and agreeably aromatic oil, which is similar to that of the sour orange leaf, though the rind oil of the latter is different.
      The bergamot has been known in the Mediterranean for several centuries, the distinctive and desirable characteristics of its oil having been recognized as early as 1750.

21
nov
scrub-viso-naturale
25
jun
raspberry

Raspberry

Very fragile fruit, but yummy!!

Thanks to their vitamin C content, raspberries are known for their anti-inflammatory properties of the respiratory tract; only recently, thanks to recent scientific studies, came to light, especially with regard to the variety of dark raspberries, anticancer properties of this delicious fruit.

Even the leaves of raspberry, as rich in tannins, have healing properties that can bring benefits to our health: an infusion with its leaves is very useful against...

08
may
cellulite

Cellulite

Cellulite affects especially women and the most common spots where they form are the abdomen, buttocks and thighs.
It is caused by an alteration of the microcirculation caused by deposits of water, fat and impurities.
To decrease the need to maintain a good metabolism, maybe stimulating walks before meals and follow a balanced diet and avoid strict diets that cause excessive weight increases then.

You can also avoid sugary sweets and foods, animal fats and oil, and you can do a self massage...

18
jul
chives

Chives

Chives is the common name of Allium schoenoprasum.

A perennial plant, it is widespread in nature across much of Europe, Asia and North America

Chives are grown for their scapes, which are used for culinary purposes as a flavoring herb, and provide a somewhat milder flavor than those of other Allium species. The smallest and most delicate member of the onion family, chives are a popular herb used in European cookery. They have long, thin green blades that are hollow inside. They have a mild,...

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

17
sep
lovage

Lovage

It is in flower from July to August and seeds ripen from August to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by insects.
The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

Lovage is a warming and tonic herb for the digestive and respiratory system. It is used primarily in the treatment of indigestion, poor appetite, wind, colic and bronchitis. The roots, leaves and fruits are antispasmodic, aromatic, carmative, diuretic. They are...