05
nov
2015

bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has the fresh, sweet, citrus scent that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea. Uplifting and relaxing, it is good for building confidence and enhancing your mood. It has a long history of use for oily and troubled skin.

While the distinctive fruit of the bergamot (bergamotto of Italy, bergamote of France) is sometimes referred to as an orange, its resemblances to the oranges are so remote or lacking that it seems best to employ the European usage.  Both the origin of the name and its significance are obscure.  It appears to be a hybrid of the sour orange, however, for which reason it has commonly been regarded as a botanical variety of C. aurantium L.  Since the differences are numerous and marked and a wide degree of variation is exhibited, separate species standing seems to be justified.
      The tree is moderately vigorous, upright to spreading in habit, virtually thornless, and with new shoot growth not pink- or purple-tinted.  At full maturity it is medium-small to medium in size.  The leaves are large and somewhat like the lemon in color, form, and emargination, although the blades are sharper-pointed and the petioles are longer and more broadly winged.
      The flower buds and flowers are medium-large and pure white and there is but one bloom.  The lemon-yellow-colored fruits are small to medium-large, oblate, round obovate or broadly pyriform, frequently possess a small navel, and usually have a persistent style.  The rind is medium-thin with a smooth to moderately rough surface, commonly ridged, and adherent.  The segments are numerous and the core solid.  The flesh is moderately firm, pale greenish-yellow, and highly acid with a faint bitter aftertaste.  The highly monoembryonic seeds, comparatively few and sometimes none, often are not well developed.  The cotyledons are white or faintly green.
      A distinctive characteristic of both foliage and fruits is the strongly pungent and agreeably aromatic oil, which is similar to that of the sour orange leaf, though the rind oil of the latter is different.
      The bergamot has been known in the Mediterranean for several centuries, the distinctive and desirable characteristics of its oil having been recognized as early as 1750.

06
apr
aromatic-herbs

Aromatic herbs

Each of us can grow herbs at home rather than buying them at the grocery store.

For seedlings, herbs or seeds if you want to see growth, can be purchased in any nursery and there is often a choice of many varieties.
Should be seeded and kept in the Sun because they can germinate in the most natural way, but also requires a fairly humid environment to ensure that the first seedlings begin to sprout.
For some species of plants can also remove cuttings from existing plants (but not flowers) and...

02
jan
lemon-beebrush

Lemon beebrush

Aloysia citrodora is a species of flowering plant in the verbena family Verbenaceae, native to western South America. Common names include lemon verbena and lemon beebrush.

Lemon verbena leaves are used to add a lemon flavor to fish and poultry dishes, vegetable marinades, salad dressings, jams, puddings, Greek yogurt and beverages. It also is used to make herbal teas, or added to standard tea in place of actual lemon (as is common with Moroccan tea). It can also be used to make a sorbet.

11
may
edible-flowers:-sunflowers

Edible flowers: sunflowers

The finishing touch for a slap is traditionally a floral arrangement. But did you know that an amazing variety of flowers are not only ornamental but also have a great flavor?

Most of the flowers don't withstands high temperatures of cooking, so these or are incorporated at the last moment or used only as decoration.

The sunflower when mature, is covered with coarse hair and is inedible. The flower buds are very tender and edible. They can be steamed or even fries! Their flavor reminiscent of...

02
jan
angelica-herb

Angelica herb

Angelica is used extensively in herbal medicine. The main constituents of Angelica are volatile oils, valeric acid, angelic acid, angelicin, safrole, scopoletin, and linoleic acid, making it useful in the treatment of fevers, colds, coughs, flatulent colic and other stomach disorders. A medicinal infusion made from stems, seeds, and root is carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, sedative, stomachic and tonic. Angelica is used for obstructed menses and should not be taken in large quantities by...

04
jul
purslane

Purslane

It's known as purslane - a plant that is a troublesome weed in many U.S. crops, especially vegetables. But recent research findings confirm that purslane is also a rich source of fatty acids, vitamin E, and other key nutrients - making it a prime candidate as a new vegetable crop. It is known for its persistence - it grows even in poor-quality soils with little water and resists disease...

In summary, purslane makes a nice addition to salads, soups and sautés. This is called versatility. Add...

25
jul
mirtilli