05
nov
2015

bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has the fresh, sweet, citrus scent that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea. Uplifting and relaxing, it is good for building confidence and enhancing your mood. It has a long history of use for oily and troubled skin.

While the distinctive fruit of the bergamot (bergamotto of Italy, bergamote of France) is sometimes referred to as an orange, its resemblances to the oranges are so remote or lacking that it seems best to employ the European usage.  Both the origin of the name and its significance are obscure.  It appears to be a hybrid of the sour orange, however, for which reason it has commonly been regarded as a botanical variety of C. aurantium L.  Since the differences are numerous and marked and a wide degree of variation is exhibited, separate species standing seems to be justified.
      The tree is moderately vigorous, upright to spreading in habit, virtually thornless, and with new shoot growth not pink- or purple-tinted.  At full maturity it is medium-small to medium in size.  The leaves are large and somewhat like the lemon in color, form, and emargination, although the blades are sharper-pointed and the petioles are longer and more broadly winged.
      The flower buds and flowers are medium-large and pure white and there is but one bloom.  The lemon-yellow-colored fruits are small to medium-large, oblate, round obovate or broadly pyriform, frequently possess a small navel, and usually have a persistent style.  The rind is medium-thin with a smooth to moderately rough surface, commonly ridged, and adherent.  The segments are numerous and the core solid.  The flesh is moderately firm, pale greenish-yellow, and highly acid with a faint bitter aftertaste.  The highly monoembryonic seeds, comparatively few and sometimes none, often are not well developed.  The cotyledons are white or faintly green.
      A distinctive characteristic of both foliage and fruits is the strongly pungent and agreeably aromatic oil, which is similar to that of the sour orange leaf, though the rind oil of the latter is different.
      The bergamot has been known in the Mediterranean for several centuries, the distinctive and desirable characteristics of its oil having been recognized as early as 1750.

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

18
jul
chives

Chives

Chives is the common name of Allium schoenoprasum.

A perennial plant, it is widespread in nature across much of Europe, Asia and North America

Chives are grown for their scapes, which are used for culinary purposes as a flavoring herb, and provide a somewhat milder flavor than those of other Allium species. The smallest and most delicate member of the onion family, chives are a popular herb used in European cookery. They have long, thin green blades that are hollow inside. They have a mild,...

29
aug
myrtle

Myrtle

The fruits have an aromatic perfume and are often used as a venison dishes.

The leaves are used to flavor and spicy dishes and seafood; used dried for flavoring syrups or sauces.

The flowers are sweet and are used in salads.

10
oct
dill

Dill

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is an annual herb in the celery family Apiaceae. "Dill" is a Germanic word whose origin is unknown.

Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called "dill weed" to distinguish it from dill seed) are widely used as herbs in Europe and central Asia.

Like caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavor many foods such as gravlax (cured salmon) and other fish dishes, borscht and other soups, as well as pickles (where the dill flower is sometimes...

29
apr
ivy-salad

Ivy salad

Thoroughly wash the fennel, cicerbite and chives and cut them into a salad bowl.
Mix everything together and add olive oil, lemon, salt and a pinch of pepper.
Give your salad a unique aroma adding Ivy flowers and some mint leaves for garnish.

Ingredients:

- fennel
- chives
- mint leaves
- flowers of Ivy
- cicerbite
- olive oil
- salt
- pepper
- lemon

10
oct
highlighters-chestnut

Highlighters Chestnut

October is time for chestnuts, here are some natural remedies with peels or chestnut leaves chestnut dried

The boiling water chestnut is a hair highlighters. If you have brown hair will need to boil the skins in water chestnuts or chestnuts same for twenty minutes; however if you have blond hair put to boil the water chestnut leaves (preferably dried) for 20 minutes.
To obtain copper hues to dark hair, and golden hair clear, let cool the infusion and wet hair still soft after shampooing.

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La bottega del mulino n°1

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