05
dec
2016

chamomile

Chamomile or camomile (/ˈkæmɵml/ KAM-ə-meel or /ˈkæmɵml/ KAM-ə-myl)is the common name for several daisy-like plants of the family Asteraceae that are commonly used to make herb infusions to serve various medicinal purposes. Popular uses of chamomile preparations include treating hay fever, inflammation, muscle spasm, menstrual disorders, insomnia, ulcers, gastrointestinal disorder, and hemorrhoids.
The word "chamomile" derives, via French and Latin, from Greek χαμαίμηλον (khamaimēlon), i.e. "earth apple", from χαμαί (khamai) "on the ground" and μῆλον (mēlon) "apple".

Chamomile has been used for inflammation associated with hemorrhoids when topically applied.There is Level B evidence that chamomile possesses anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) properties and could be used to treat stress and insomnia . Chemical components of chamomile extract have demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antigenotoxic, and anticancer properties when examined in vitro and in animal studies.

Major chemical compounds present within chamomile include apigenin and alpha-bisabolol.Other compounds in chamomile include: sesquiterpenes, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarins such as herniarin and umbelliferone, phenylpropanoids such as chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid, flavones such as apigenin and luteolin, flavanols such as quercetin and rutin, and polyacetylenes. Apigenin has demonstrated chemopreventive effects against cancer cells in the laboratory, and alpha-bisabolol has been shown to have antiseptic properties, anti-inflammatory properties, and reduces pepsin secretion without altering secretion of stomach acid.

Anticancer effect – Studies have shown that chamomile extracts have in vitro growth inhibitory effects on cancer cells in skin, prostate, breast, ovarian, prostate cancer cell lines with minimal effects on normal cells.

Anticoagulant effect – Coumarin compounds in chamomile such as herniarin and umbelliferone may have blood-thinning properties. However the mechanism is not well understood.

Antiinflammatory effect – Several chemical constituents of chamomile such as bisabolol, chamazulene, apigenin, and loteolin possess anti-inflammatory properties although exact mechanism is not well characterized.

Antimicrobial effects – Chamazulene, alpha-bisabolol, flavonoids, and umbelliferone have antifungal activities. A number of in vitro studies showed chamomile’s antimycobacteria activity, inhibition of the growth of poliovirus and herpes virus, blockage of aggregation of Helicobacter pylori and numerous strains of Escherichia coli. Chamomile oil was demonstrated in studies to be effective against gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Bacillus species.

Antispasmodic/antidiarrheal effects – Bisabolol and flavonoids have demonstrated antispasmodic effects in animal experiments. In human studies, chamomile tea in combination with other herbs (vervain, licorice, fennel, balm mint) was shown to be effective in treating colic in children. Flavonoids and coumarins are considered smooth muscle relaxants.

Because chamomile has been known to cause uterine contractions that can invoke miscarriage, the U.S. National Institutes of Health recommends that pregnant and nursing mothers not consume Roman chamomile

Chamomile is frequently added to skin cosmetics to serve as an emollient, and for its anti-inflammatory effects. Chamomile is also often used to enhance the color of blonde hair

23
jul
berries

Berries

The berries are groups of individual seeds, can be used on ice cream or fresh cooked and made into jam.
Have depurative, diuretic, anti-rheumatic and refreshing proprieties; not only that, they also help fight cardiovascular disease, keeping it clean and elastic arteries, because they help to eliminate the "bad" cholesterol from the blood.
In case of intestinal problems, is shown taking more or other berries because they contain a good percentage of fibers.

21
nov
scrub-viso-naturale
22
oct
la-firenze-de-i-medici
05
dec
horseradish

Horseradish

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage)
The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia.
The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and...

17
nov
rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary is an herb in the mint family. It is a small evergreen shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, whose 1-inch leaves resemble curved pine needles.

Rosemary is native to the Mediterranean.

Rosemary's assertive flavor blends well with garlic to season lamb roasts, meat stews, and marinades. Rosemary also enlivens lighter fish dishes, tomato sauces, and vegetables. Melt butter with Rosemary to dress freshly steamed red potatoes and peas or a stir-fried mixture of zucchini and summer squash. Crush...

23
aug
parsley

Parsley

Its leaves are rich in vitamins and becomes good more or less in every dish that requires a fresh taste!

The peasant wisdom advised her to rub a sprig of parsley on a puncture wound and stings to relieve pain.

This map is also useful to relieve menstrual pains that often put KO many women and against high blood pressure simply by drinking an infusion of parsley seeds in hot water.

An infusion is also useful in case of intestinal gas.

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La bottega del mulino n°1

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