chianti-:-medicis-wine

The history of Chianti dates back to at least the 13th century with the earliest incarnations of Chianti as a white wine. Today this Tuscan wine is one of Italy's most well known and recognizable wines. In the Middle Ages, the villages of Gaiole, Castellina and Radda located near Florence formed as a Lega del Chianti (League of Chianti) creating an area that would become the spiritual and historical "heart" of the Chianti region and today is located within the Chianti Classico Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG). As the wines of Chianti grew in popularity other villages in Tuscany wanted their lands to be called Chianti. The boundaries of the region have seen many expansions and sub-divisions over the centuries. The variable terroir of these different macroclimates contributed to diverging range of quality on the market and by the late 20th century consumer perception of Chianti was often associated with basic mass-market Chianti sold in a squat bottle enclosed in a straw basket, called fiasco.[1]

In addition to changing boundaries, the grape composition for Chianti has changed dramatically over the years. The earliest examples of Chianti were a white wine but gradually evolved into a red. Baron Bettino Ricasoli, the future Prime Minister in the Kingdom of Italy created the first known "Chianti recipe" in 1872, recommending 70% Sangiovese, 15% Canaiolo and 15% Malvasia bianca. In 1967, the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) regulation set by the Italian government firmly established the "Ricasoli formula" of a Sangiovese-based blend with 10-30% Malvasia and Trebbiano. However some producers desired to make Chianti that did not conform to these standards-such as a 100% varietal Sangiovese wine, or all red wine grape varieties and perhaps with allowance for French grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot to be used. A few producers went ahead and made their "chianti" as they desired but, prohibited from labeling, sold them as simple vino da tavola. Despite their low level classifications, these "super Chiantis" became internationally recognized by critics and consumers and were coined as Super Tuscans. The success of these wines encouraged government officials to reconsider the DOCG regulations with many changes made to allow some of these vino da tavola to be labeled as Chiantis

20
may
raspberry-mouthwash

Raspberry mouthwash

Ingredients: 100 ml of water, raspberry leaves

Mince and chopped some raspberry leaves (according to the use you make of mouthwash) and pour 100 ml of boiling water over 3 teaspoons of chopped leaves.
Let stand, then strain. Use it for external use against skin diseases and inflammation of the mouth; for mouthwash and gargle several times a day.

14
sep
myrrhis

Myrrhis

Also known as Myrhh, this is grown in the garden both as an herb and flowering perennial. Foliage is bright green and almost fernlike in appearance, with a strong flavor and smell of sweet licorice. Large umbels of tiny white flowers appear in early summer, followed by shiny black seeds. Prune back hard after flowering to rejuvenate the leaves. Excellent for specimen effect in the June border. Seeds may be used to propagate, but must be sown immediately when fresh, in late summer.

Myrrhis...

08
aug
coriander

Coriander

Coriander is one of the world's most commonly used herbs - in spite of the fact that the name comes from the Greek, koris, meaning bed bug! It is green, leafy and strong-smelling with a fresh, citrus taste that makes it an invaluable garnish and flavour enhancer. Both the fresh leaves and stalks are edible, as well as the berries, which are dried and called coriander seeds. Native to southern Europe and the Middle East, the plant is now grown worldwide. Coriander tends to be associated most...

26
jan
arctium-lappa

Arctium lappa

Arctium lappa, commonly called greater burdock, gobō, edible burdock, lappa, or beggar's buttons, is a Eurasian species of plants in the sunflower family, cultivated in gardens for its root used as a vegetable. It has become an invasive weed of high-nitrogen soils in North America, Australia, and other region

It prefers a fresh, worked soil, rich in humus, and should be positioned in full sunlight. Burdock is very reactive to nitrogen fertilizer. Propagation is achieved through sowing the...

17
mar
diy-dishwashing

DIY dishwashing

You no longer need to buy the detergent by following this recipe for homemade preparation of this product, with natural ingredients. You can prepare a dish detergent from the ash of firewood, or lemons or homemade SOAP with the cold method. Even the liquid ecological soap can be useful for the purpose.

LEMONS AND VINEGARD

This detergent from lemons and vinegar washes the dishes, despite being free from surfactants, thanks to the degreasing action of these two ingredients. It's cheap and easy...

30
mar
oli-essenziali

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La bottega del mulino n°1

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