26
sep
2016

thyme-plant

The thyme group of herbs is aromatic, versatile, and plentiful -- over fifty varieties are judged beneficial for culinary or garden uses.

When cooking with thyme be sure to add it early in the process so the oils and flavor have time to be released. This herb is great when used fresh, and goes well in many typical southern Italy pasta sauces which often feature peppers and eggplants. Thyme also is a great complement for many vegetables, including tomatoes and roasted potatoes. Many grilled and oven roasted fish recipes, such as spigola (sea bass) ortriglie al forno (mullets), call for thyme. For roasted and grilled meats, thyme marries well with sage and rosemary. When you grill, you can get great results if you marinate the meat for a few hours before grilling with those three herbs (thyme, sage and rosemary), along with good quality Italian olive oil and pepper. Thyme is often used in stocks and stews - it is an essential component of the bouquet garni and herbes de Provence that are often used in Italian cooking - and in aromatic oils as well.

The essential oil of common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) - usually referred to as "oil of thyme" - contains 20-54% thymol. Thymol belongs to a naturally-occurring class of compounds known as "biocides" (substances that can destroy harmful organisms). When thymus is used alongside other biocides, such as carvacrol, it has strong antimicrobial attibutes. Scientists at the University of Manitoba, Canada, wrote in the International Journal of Food Microbiology3 that thymol can reduce bacterial resistance to common drugs such as penicillin.

08
may
cellulite

Cellulite

Cellulite affects especially women and the most common spots where they form are the abdomen, buttocks and thighs.
It is caused by an alteration of the microcirculation caused by deposits of water, fat and impurities.
To decrease the need to maintain a good metabolism, maybe stimulating walks before meals and follow a balanced diet and avoid strict diets that cause excessive weight increases then.

You can also avoid sugary sweets and foods, animal fats and oil, and you can do a self massage...

14
sep
myrrhis

Myrrhis

Also known as Myrhh, this is grown in the garden both as an herb and flowering perennial. Foliage is bright green and almost fernlike in appearance, with a strong flavor and smell of sweet licorice. Large umbels of tiny white flowers appear in early summer, followed by shiny black seeds. Prune back hard after flowering to rejuvenate the leaves. Excellent for specimen effect in the June border. Seeds may be used to propagate, but must be sown immediately when fresh, in late summer.

Myrrhis...

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

30
jul
mint

Mint

Mint leaves can be used fresh or dried and used later.

Bring flavor to iced or hot teas, fruit drinks, vegetables (peas and carrots).

The Mint salasa is an excellent side dish to lamb.

In the heat of these days, is nice a refreshing good drink with water and mint leaves, put in the refrigerator to become cold!
Has digestive properties, antiseptic and sedative properties.

02
jul
vitamin-a

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is found in the liver, spinach, broccol, carrots, Zucchini, oranges, tomatoes and apricots and has many positive effects: anticanerogena, antiosidante, prevents skin aging, promotes the growth of nails, teeth and hair and improves eyesight.

The overcooking of foods destroy the vitamin A content of the same.

Vitamin A brings considerable benefits to men, as it increases sperm production, but also in women because it counteracts the negative effects of premenstrual syndrome. During...

08
aug
coriander

Coriander

Coriander is one of the world's most commonly used herbs - in spite of the fact that the name comes from the Greek, koris, meaning bed bug! It is green, leafy and strong-smelling with a fresh, citrus taste that makes it an invaluable garnish and flavour enhancer. Both the fresh leaves and stalks are edible, as well as the berries, which are dried and called coriander seeds. Native to southern Europe and the Middle East, the plant is now grown worldwide. Coriander tends to be associated most...

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