02
sep
2016

fennel

The health benefits of fennel include relief from anemia, indigestion, flatulence, constipation, colic, diarrhea, respiratory disorders, menstrual disorders, and its benefits regarding eye care. Fennel, which has the scientific name Foeniculum Vulgare Miller, or its essence, is widely used around the world in mouth fresheners, toothpastes, desserts, antacids and in various culinary applications.

It originated in the Mediterranean and those cultures have long used it for culinary and medicinal reasons. It has not been spread and naturalized as an herb around the world, but still primarily grows in coastal climates and on riverbanks. It is also one of the main components of the alcohol absinthe, although the plant does not have hallucinogenic properties.

Wild fennel was transplanted, cultivated and cherished by early Greeks and Romans. The mythologies of both cultures regarded it as a gift from the gods due to its medicinal and culinary properties.

Today, fennel is a main component of Italian and French cooking. It is used in the popular eating plan known as the Mediterranean Diet, and is cultivated in the United States, France, India and Russia.

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

05
nov
bergamot

Bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) has the fresh, sweet, citrus scent that is familiar to many as the flavoring in Earl Grey Tea. Uplifting and relaxing, it is good for building confidence and enhancing your mood. It has a long history of use for oily and troubled skin.

While the distinctive fruit of the bergamot (bergamotto of Italy, bergamote of France) is sometimes referred to as an orange, its resemblances to the oranges are so remote or lacking that it seems best to employ the European...

11
may
edible-flowers:-sunflowers

Edible flowers: sunflowers

The finishing touch for a slap is traditionally a floral arrangement. But did you know that an amazing variety of flowers are not only ornamental but also have a great flavor?

Most of the flowers don't withstands high temperatures of cooking, so these or are incorporated at the last moment or used only as decoration.

The sunflower when mature, is covered with coarse hair and is inedible. The flower buds are very tender and edible. They can be steamed or even fries! Their flavor reminiscent of...

14
nov
crema-mani-fai-da-te
06
mar
valentinas-bred

Valentina's bred

This beauty is what Valentina takes us for breakfast every times he likes to dabble in the kitchen with organic cooking methods.

We propose the recipe; try and tell us what you think!

INGREDIENS:

- 4 tablespoons of sour dough
-1/3 cups lukewarm water
- 1 Kg of organic flour itegrale
- 500 g of flour manitoba
-1 Kg of organic semolina flour 
- 4 teaspoons of sunflower seeds
- 4 teaspoons of organic flaxseed
- 2 teaspoons of organic poppy seeds Sesame
- 4 teaspoons of organic pumpkin seeds
-1...

23
oct
pimpinella

Pimpinella

The Pimpinella plant genus consists hardy annual herbs that reach from 45 to 90 cm in height.

Some common names for Pimpinella include Aniseed and Anise.

Aniseed blooms in the summer with umbels of tiny white flowers and plants are converted for their seeds; these should be harvested once they begin to turn gray and loosen easily from their coats.

An essential oil is obtained from the seed, used in perfumery, tooth pastes, medicinally and as a food flavouring.
The powdered seed can be used...

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