08
aug
2016

coriander

Coriander is one of the world's most commonly used herbs - in spite of the fact that the name comes from the Greek, koris, meaning bed bug! It is green, leafy and strong-smelling with a fresh, citrus taste that makes it an invaluable garnish and flavour enhancer. Both the fresh leaves and stalks are edible, as well as the berries, which are dried and called coriander seeds. Native to southern Europe and the Middle East, the plant is now grown worldwide. Coriander tends to be associated most with Asian and Central and South American cooking.
Try adding a teaspoon next time you make posole, enchiladas, or even just a pot of beans. You'll also find coriander in a lot of Indian cooking, where it's used as one of the spices in many curry dishes. It makes a great component in spice rubs for fish and chicken, and adds a nice bright flavor when making homemade pickles.

The health benefits of coriander include its use in the treatment of skin inflammation , high cholesterol levels, diarrhea, mouth ulcers, anemia, indigestion, menstrual disorders, smallpox, conjunctivitis, skin disorders, and blood sugar disorders, while also benefiting eye care.

Coriander, commonly known as Dhania in the Indian Subcontinent and Cilantro in the Americas and some parts of Europe, is an herb that is extensively used around the world as a condiment, garnish, or decoration on culinary dishes. Its scientific name is Coriandrum Sativum L. Its leaves and fruits have a recognizable and pleasant aroma and are commonly used raw or dried for culinary applications.
Its uses in global food preparation is only the tip of the iceberg. Unbeknownst to many people, coriander is packed with potential health benefits that most people completely miss when they toss this garnish into the garbage after eating their meal. It has eleven components of essential oils, six types of acids (including ascorbic acid, better known as vitamin-C), minerals and vitamins, each having a number of beneficial properties.

29
apr
ivy-salad

Ivy salad

Ingredients:

- fennel
- chives
- mint leaves
- flowers of Ivy
- cicerbite
- olive oil
- salt
- pepper
- lemon

Procedure:

Thoroughly wash the fennel, cicerbite and chives and cut them into a salad bowl.
Mix everything together and add olive oil, lemon, salt and a pinch of pepper.
Give your salad a unique aroma adding Ivy flowers and some mint leaves for garnish.

06
apr
aromatic-herbs

Aromatic herbs

Each of us can grow herbs at home rather than buying them at the grocery store.

For seedlings, herbs or seeds if you want to see growth, can be purchased in any nursery and there is often a choice of many varieties.
Should be seeded and kept in the Sun because they can germinate in the most natural way, but also requires a fairly humid environment to ensure that the first seedlings begin to sprout.
For some species of plants can also remove cuttings from existing plants (but not flowers) and...

25
apr
kefir-of-milk

Kefir of milk

Nothing less than fermented milk similar to yogurt, Kefir is a refreshing and healthy, rich in enzymes and probiotics alive and benefits, fresh, slightly acidic but pleasant flavor.

Discovered and immediately appreciated by humans thousands of years ago, originally from the Caucasus, Kefir is prepared in the traditional way using fresh milk (sheep, goat or cow).

This drink is considered a miracle food for our body, because it contains, in addition to enzymes, minerals such as calcium,...

12
jan
aromatic-faith

Aromatic faith

It belongs to the family of Amaranthaceae. The Faith is an Aromatic annual or perennial plant with erect stem 30-70 cm tall, with Lance-shaped leaves, fragrant flowers with yellow-green (bloom July-October), with the result that consists of a membranous otricello with seeds that ripen from August to October.

Often used in Mexican dishes, beans like cheese quesadilla; tastes very similar to the quinoa.
Properties: anthelmintic, antibacterial, digestive. It is indicated for the treatment of:...

17
nov
rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary is an herb in the mint family. It is a small evergreen shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, whose 1-inch leaves resemble curved pine needles.

Rosemary is native to the Mediterranean.

Rosemary's assertive flavor blends well with garlic to season lamb roasts, meat stews, and marinades. Rosemary also enlivens lighter fish dishes, tomato sauces, and vegetables. Melt butter with Rosemary to dress freshly steamed red potatoes and peas or a stir-fried mixture of zucchini and summer squash. Crush...

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

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