08
aug
2016

coriander

Coriander is one of the world's most commonly used herbs - in spite of the fact that the name comes from the Greek, koris, meaning bed bug! It is green, leafy and strong-smelling with a fresh, citrus taste that makes it an invaluable garnish and flavour enhancer. Both the fresh leaves and stalks are edible, as well as the berries, which are dried and called coriander seeds. Native to southern Europe and the Middle East, the plant is now grown worldwide. Coriander tends to be associated most with Asian and Central and South American cooking.
Try adding a teaspoon next time you make posole, enchiladas, or even just a pot of beans. You'll also find coriander in a lot of Indian cooking, where it's used as one of the spices in many curry dishes. It makes a great component in spice rubs for fish and chicken, and adds a nice bright flavor when making homemade pickles.

The health benefits of coriander include its use in the treatment of skin inflammation , high cholesterol levels, diarrhea, mouth ulcers, anemia, indigestion, menstrual disorders, smallpox, conjunctivitis, skin disorders, and blood sugar disorders, while also benefiting eye care.

Coriander, commonly known as Dhania in the Indian Subcontinent and Cilantro in the Americas and some parts of Europe, is an herb that is extensively used around the world as a condiment, garnish, or decoration on culinary dishes. Its scientific name is Coriandrum Sativum L. Its leaves and fruits have a recognizable and pleasant aroma and are commonly used raw or dried for culinary applications.
Its uses in global food preparation is only the tip of the iceberg. Unbeknownst to many people, coriander is packed with potential health benefits that most people completely miss when they toss this garnish into the garbage after eating their meal. It has eleven components of essential oils, six types of acids (including ascorbic acid, better known as vitamin-C), minerals and vitamins, each having a number of beneficial properties.

15
jun
wine-and-sage-for-your-skin-tone

Wine and Sage for your skin tone

SAGE WINE

30 g of Sage leaves, 1 l of red wine

Put Sage to macerate for a week in red wine.
At the end of the sorted the infusion and store it in a bottles.
This wine has tonic, anti-rheumatic and digestive properties.
You should drink the infusion at least 2 times a day.

Tri it with one of our organic red wines!

20
nov
sorrel

Sorrel

Common sorrel or garden sorrel (Rumex acetosa), often simply called sorrel, is a perennial herb in the family Polygonaceae. Other names for sorrel include spinach dock and narrow-leaved dock. It is a common plant in grassland habitats and is cultivated as a garden herb or leaf vegetable (pot herb)

Common sorrel has been cultivated for centuries. The leaves may be puréed in soups and sauces or added to salads; they have a flavour that is similar to kiwifruit or sour wild strawberries. The...

23
sep
thai-basil

Thai basil

Thai basil is a type of basil native to Southeast Asia that has been cultivated to provide distinctive traits. Widely used throughout Southeast Asia, its flavor, described as anise- and licorice-like and slightly spicy, is more stable under high or extended cooking temperatures than that of sweet basil. Thai basil has small, narrow leaves, purple stems, and pink-purple flowers.

Thai basil is a tender perennial but is typically grown as an annual. As a tropical plant, Thai basil is hardy only...

10
apr
honey-and-cosmetic

Honey and cosmetic

HONEY MASK

acacia honey, pine family or thyme

With refreshed face and just dried, spread a thin layer of honey, leaving it under for about 20 minutes, then rinse.
For its qualities, honey mask is indicated for dehydrated and dried, but is also useful for keeping in good health of every skin type.
The properties of the form can of course be extended to the whole body, sprinkling and immersing himself entirely, after few minutes in lukewarm bath.

You find the honey for your masks and a range...

03
jan
matrimonio-in-cantina
04
jul
purslane

Purslane

It's known as purslane - a plant that is a troublesome weed in many U.S. crops, especially vegetables. But recent research findings confirm that purslane is also a rich source of fatty acids, vitamin E, and other key nutrients - making it a prime candidate as a new vegetable crop. It is known for its persistence - it grows even in poor-quality soils with little water and resists disease...

In summary, purslane makes a nice addition to salads, soups and sautés. This is called versatility. Add...