13
aug
2015

b-vitamins

B vitamins are a class of water-soluble vitamins that play important roles in cell metabolism. Though these vitamins share similar names, research shows that they are chemically distinct vitamins that often coexist in the same foods. In general, supplements containing all eight are referred to as a vitamin B complex. Individual B vitamin supplements are referred to by the specific name of each vitamin (e.g., B1, B2, B3 etc.)

Further below a list of the B vitamins:

  • Vitamin B1 (thiamine)
  • Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)
  • Vitamin B3 (niacin or nicotinic acid)
  • Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)
  • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine)
  • Vitamin B7 (biotin)
  • Vitamin B9 (folic acid)
  • Vitamin B12 (various cobalamins; commonly cyanocobalamin or methylcobalamin in vitamin supplements)

B vitamins are particularly concentrated in meat such as turkey, tuna and liver. Good sources for B vitamins include legumes (pulses or beans), whole grains, potatoes, bananas, chili peppers, tempeh, nutritional yeast, brewer's yeast, and molasses. Although the yeast used to make beer results in beers being a source of B vitamins,their bioavailability ranges from poor to negative as drinking ethanol inhibits absorption of thiamine (B1),riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), biotin (B7), and folic acid (B9). In addition, each of the preceding studies further emphasizes that elevated consumption of beer and other alcoholic beverages results in a net deficit of those B vitamins and the health risks associated with such deficiencies.

The B12 vitamin is of note because it is not available from plant products, making B12 deficiency a legitimate concern for vegans. Manufacturers of plant-based foods will sometimes report B12 content, leading to confusion about what sources yield B12. The confusion arises because the standard US Pharmacopeia (USP) method for measuring the B12 content does not measure the B12 directly. Instead, it measures a bacterial response to the food. Chemical variants of the B12 vitamin found in plant sources are active for bacteria, but cannot be used by the human body. This same phenomenon can cause significant over-reporting of B12 content in other types of foods as well.

Another popular means of increasing one's vitamin B intake is through the use of dietary supplements. B vitamins are also commonly added to energy drinks, many of which have been marketed with large amounts of B vitaminswith claims that this will cause the consumer to "sail through your day without feeling jittery or tense."Some nutritionists have been critical of these claims, pointing out for instance that while B vitamins do "help unlock the energy in foods," most Americans acquire the necessary amounts easily in their diets.

Because they are soluble in water, excess B vitamins (such as may be ingested via supplements) are generally readily excreted, although individual absorption, use and metabolism may vary…"The elderly and athletes may need to supplement their intake of B12 and other B vitamins due to problems in absorption and increased needs for energy production. In cases of severe deficiency B vitamins, especially B12, may also be delivered by injection to reverse deficiencies. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics may also be advised to supplement thiamine based on high prevalence of low plasma thiamine concentration and increased thiamine clearance associated with diabetes. Also, Vitamin B9 (folic acid) deficiency in early embryo development has been linked to neural tube defects. Thus, women planning to become pregnant are usually encouraged to increase daily dietary folic acid intake and/or take a supplement.

05
oct
lemon-balm

Lemon balm

Lemon Balm was dedicated to the goddess Diana, and used medicinally by the Greeks some 2,000 years ago. In the Middles Ages lemon balm was used to soothe tension, to dress wounds, and as a cure for toothache, skin eruptions, mad dog bites, crooked necks, and sickness during pregnancy. It was even said to prevent baldness. As a medicinal plant, lemon balm has traditionally been employed against bronchial inflammation, earache, fever, flatulence, headaches, high blood pressure, influenza, mood...

13
nov
sage

Sage

Sage is native to the northern Mediterranean coast, where it's used frequently in cooking. Sage's long, narrow leaves have a distinctively fuzzy texture and musty flavor redolent of eucalyptus, cedar, lemon, and mint. Italians love it with veal, while the French add it to stuffings, cured meats, sausages, and pork dishes. Americans, of course, associate it with turkey and dressing.

Sage pairs perfectly with rosemary and thyme in many dishes. Besides its versatility and compatibility with other...

31
dec
wildschwein

Wildschwein

ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons/60 ml extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 carrot, coarsely chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped
  • 2 pounds/900 g wild boar, cubed
  • 1/2 teaspoon/2.5 ml nutmeg
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup/250 ml red wine
  • 1 (28-ounce/800 g) can pureed tomatoes
  • 1 cup/250 ml beef broth

Heat up the extra-virgin olive oil in a large stewing pot. Add the onion, carrot, and celery. Cook until the vegetables have become soft. Add the cubed wild...

11
sep
vitamin-b9-and-trigonella

Vitamin B9 and Trigonella

Vitamin B9, also known as folic acid, has many properties.
Plays an important role in brain functioning, effectiveness and into the bloodstream.
It is essential in cell division and formation of the genetic material.
Accommodation in yeast, leafy green vegetables and legumes.
It is useful for heart disease and prevents fetal spina bifida.

The seeds of Trigonella are a key ingredient in curry powder.
It's a bitter vegetables if consumed fresh, scent of celery and spinach.
If mixed with the dough...

23
oct
pimpinella

Pimpinella

The Pimpinella plant genus consists hardy annual herbs that reach from 45 to 90 cm in height.

Some common names for Pimpinella include Aniseed and Anise.

Aniseed blooms in the summer with umbels of tiny white flowers and plants are converted for their seeds; these should be harvested once they begin to turn gray and loosen easily from their coats.

An essential oil is obtained from the seed, used in perfumery, tooth pastes, medicinally and as a food flavouring.
The powdered seed can be used...

20
nov
sorrel

Sorrel

Common sorrel or garden sorrel (Rumex acetosa), often simply called sorrel, is a perennial herb in the family Polygonaceae. Other names for sorrel include spinach dock and narrow-leaved dock. It is a common plant in grassland habitats and is cultivated as a garden herb or leaf vegetable (pot herb)

Common sorrel has been cultivated for centuries. The leaves may be puréed in soups and sauces or added to salads; they have a flavour that is similar to kiwifruit or sour wild strawberries. The...